.

v
 

       Estimated Average glucose (eAG) correlates directly to HbA1C. 

AACC advises labs to report eAG.  


That term, “estimated average glucose (eAG),” refers to the result of a diabetic’s glycated hemoglobin (A1c) test, converted into an average blood glucose level in the units of measure seen on glucose meters. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) hope that using eAG helps patients and their doctors make the necessary changes to diet and physical activity to improve overall diabetes management.

  Part of the logic for choosing the term “eAG” is that the medical community recently adopted another new term, eGFR, for estimated glomerular filtration rate, which was introduced as an easier to understand measure of kidney function than the established method of measuring creatinine levels to assess kidney function.  The hope is that the growing acceptance of eGFR will help spur the adoption of the similar eAG.  

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) will be working together to conduct educational efforts to make both patients and providers aware of this new terminology, and help to understand the relationship between A1C and eAG. 

A mathematical relationship between the average glucose level over the preceding three months and levels of the A1C test, thus yielding translation of the A1C for reporting as estimated average glucose (eAG), was proven in an international study published online today in the August issue of Diabetes Care.  

There are two formulae for deriving eAG from percentage HbA1c. Using metric units, eAG (mg/dL)=28.7XHbA1c-46.7. Using SI units,  eAG (mmol/L)=1.59XHbA1c-2.59  

  A group of international investigators conducted a 10-center study to try to define, as accurately as possible, the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C. The study recruited 507 volunteers of various races and ethnicities: 268 type 1, 152 type 2, and 80 without diabetes. The study measured A1Cs in a central laboratory monthly for 3 months, and measured average glucose levels using a combination of continuous glucose monitoring and frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. 

 

Comparison of A1C and eAG levels  

A1C %  

   eAG (mg/dl)  

eAG (mmol/l)  

6% 

126 

7.0 

6.5% 

140 

7.8 

7% 

154 

8.6 

7.5% 

169 

9.4 

8% 

183 

10.1 

8.5% 

197 

10.9 

9% 

212 

11.8 

9.5% 

226 

12.6 

10% 

240 

13.4 

 

TO CONVERT YOUR A1C VALUE To eAG

http://professional.diabetes.org/GlucoseCalculator.aspx

                           -American Diabetes Association-

 

      

Thelabadvocate